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From left to right: Astrid Schönweger, IAWM; Dr. Kathy Sanford, University of Victoria; Dr. Darlene Clover, University of Victoria; Sissi Prader, Women’s Museum Meran; and Dr. Nancy Taber, University Brock;

It was a joy to welcome three delegates from universities in Canada at the Women’s Museum Meran. Dr. Kathy Sanford, Dr. Darlene Clover, and Dr. Nancy Taber are currently teaching at the University of Victoria. Their research about the interrelations of gender and museums made them aware of IAWM and women’s museums. After their visit at the Women’s Museum of Denmark, yesterday they visited the IAWM headquarters at the Women’s Museum Meran in order to exchange ideas and experiences.

 

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Tonight the temporary exhibition “Kümmernis – a re-discovered cult figure” will be opened at the women’s museum Meran, Italy. It tells the story of the legendary Saint Kümmernis from medieval Europe who became the patroness for women in Europe throughout centuries.

The legend tells the story of a young princess who should have been married off to the enemey by her father. In order to escape this destiny she asked god for help and he grew her a beard. Her father was so angry about his wilful daughter and crucified her. Images from a woman with a beard on the cross have fascinated people throughout centuries and is still present today.

Website women’s museum Meran, Italy

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The two volumes of “Feminism and Museums” are edited by Jenna Ashton and published by MuseumsEtc. They include not only an article called “Women’s Museums: Hubs for Feminism” written by our coordinator Astrid Schönweger, but many insightful chapters of our member museums. Continue reading

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Tomorrow the women’s museum Hittisau hosts an evening around the topic of gender roles in the process of integration.

The two researchers Dr.in Eva Grabherr and Mag.a Caroline Manahl will present their research findings around questions like: Which gender roles are brought to Europe by migrants? How do they influence integration and life the society? How important is religion in this process? What influence have categories like gender and age in this matter? How do gender roles change during the process of integration?

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On Wednesday 29 November the conference Tra Gender & Public History: Rappresentazioni e percorsi will take place in Florence. Not only IAWM will take part in this conference with a talk, but also other women’s museums from Italy.

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Since International Women’s Day 2016 the campaign inVISIBLEwomen started by Terri Bell Halliwell in the UK is calling for more plinths for women in the UK. And this is not before time, given that the 85% of civic statues that are of men and arguably form the UK’s oldest subliminal ad-campaign for the patriarchy.

Terri Bell-Halliwell writes about the latest progress:

Now one and a half years later aviator Amy Johnson’s words “believe nothing to be impossible” begin to ring true; we are witnessing a change in attitudes to civic statues.
There is a quiet, persistent power in a civic statue.

Amy Johnson statue helmet reads 'Believe bothing to be impossible' Continue reading

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GirlSpeak is a monthly podcast about girls’ history, art, and culture created by the Girl Museum.  The podcast explores topics like how girls are represented in art and museums, mythological stories and folktales, stories about awesome girls, and special topics related to exhibitions and programs of the Girl Museum

Check out the latest podcast about how girls are represented in the National Museum of African American History and Culture; Seneca Falls Women’s Rights National Historic Park; Kentucky Museum at WKU; Abbey House Museum; and Victoria and Albert Museum of Childhood.

https://girlmuseum.podbean.com/

 

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WAS – Women Artists Shows · Salons · Societies : exposi­tions collec­tives de femmes artistes 1876-1976

En partenariat avec le projet Artl@s, AWARE lance WAS (Women Artists Shows·Salons·Societies) un programme de recherche sur les expositions collectives d’artistes femmes. L’ambition de ce projet est de constituer un catalogue descriptif et analytique de ces expositions, de la fin du XIXe siècle à la fin du XXe siècle et d’entamer une réflexion sur leur histoire spécifique, à travers une étude de l’évolution des conditions sociales, culturelles et institutionnelles qui permirent ou rendirent nécessaire la tenue de telles expositions, une analyse des différents niveaux de médiations et d’agencements présents dans ce type d’expositions, ou encore un examen de leur fonctionnement symbolique et de leur réception critique. Continue reading

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